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. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it's important for us to
neighborhoods and city government to make sure that the voice of the neighborhood is heard and if problems and concerns are handled effectively and respectfully. and now, representing the mayor's office of neighborhood services i would like to welcome to the podium, the director miss cristina, palone. thank you. >> good afternoon. it is my honor and pleasure to welcome each of you to the first black history month closing ceremony, the mayor's office is dedicated to connecting city government to san francisco diverse neighborhood and community, function as to which the information is made available, particularly to those most in need. today we are honoring one of san francisco's greatest legends honorable willie l. brown junior for what he has bestowed on the local government, that he has bestowed on the local government, the state and our over all country. it is because of his exceptional dedication, and tenacity to fight injustice and provide economic growth and development that i am able to be up here today. could everyone who has worked for honorable brown or was appointed by him, pleas
relationship with the turkish government. it's a completely different world. it's completely opposite. when their armed forces show up, it's not really lacked upon as a good thin. this is why i want to say thank you to our military that's here today, to the army, the navy, the military in general, the marines, the coast guard, even i saw a couple air force running around here yesterday. the fact that you are here and you are in san francisco and you do this every year, it says a lot. because we lack at -- look at this as a good week. we have a great working relationship and after being there and seeing that it's not a good relationship and people get really, really tense when the guys in green show up, it makes me appreciate what we have all the more. there's one other thing i really appreciate, by the way, and i'll direct this to general speese being the trainer that he is, i got a whole new appreciation for muzzle discipline back there. i appreciate the fact that we drill that into our personnel that don't point anything you don't want to shoot at. because there's one point i was actu
for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch, the founder and ceo, john, will be sharing some of the work that they're doing. they're based here out of san francisco and they've got a great announcement to make. >> i am jon mills. i'm ceo of motion loft. we started about three years ago developing sensors that we could place around cities that would give us some analytics on how people move around cities and how vehicles drive around cities. so, currently we have 16 neighborhoods -- 18 neighborhoods covered in san francisco, and we get real-time data back that shows exactly h
out of your busy schedule to join us. and the mayor knows the primary responsible of the government is to keep the citizens safe and thank you all for being here. i would like to start with a little background on sandy hook, promise and who we are and what we are determined to do and why we are here today. to understand the devastation of december 14th, the shootings and origins of sandy hook promise, it is helpful to understand a little bit about newtown itself, it is a small town. it has an old fashioned sense of community. people live in newtown, because it is a great place to raise a family. that is why we moved there. both of my kids went to sandy hook elementary. my wife is a 6th grade teacher in town, two of the students killed that day lived in my small neighborhood. the gunman and his mother lived a street over from us. one of these precious children killed hawkly whose mother is here today lived across the street from the gunman. last friday would have been dillon's 7th birthday. it was a snow day, i was traveling and my wife and children were home but i received a text me
and at the end start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the authority to do that. so we move the army inland, next the navy in the coastal communities and in san feir fernandes island and doing an airlift to the most affected area. sanfernandes island is a very small island, only a thousand people living there, but it was completely destroyed. that's what we found when we arriving there, debris everywhere, and as you can see that was the port and the square before, and that was after. so the change is, it's quite impressive. the same was a local pier and a school. that was a school. nothing. so we put in the navy, the navy put them in there two, three combat ships, type 23's and l ship and transport plus mtaa aircraft transport, aircraft and hell helicopters to try to help people in there. we used the ships to deliver food, clothes and all that stuff without any problem. also we helped in different matters that the navy can do that. for instance here was with divers and with submarine robot to find bodies. getting medical assistance,
of the choice that was made to put in combined sewer systems. narrator: in 1994, the government adopted a combined sewer overflow policy to reduce csos nationwide. cities with combined sewer overflows now face an enforcement action called a consent decree. under a consent decree, a city must reduce pollution levels significantly within a strict time frame or face heavy fines. in 1960, the combined sewer overflows were a perfectly legitimate way of dealing with sewers. woman: the mind set was that, what did it matter if we were sending our waste downstream? water was a good conveyance for pollution. man: sewer systems are installed to reduce public health problems. now what you're doing is transferring the problem, you're transferring it to downstream cities. in addition, cities and towns above pittsburgh were doing the same thing. and then they were affecting the water intakes of pittsburgh. 90% of this region gets its drinking water from those same rivers that we have overflows occurring. hecht: we have sewage overflow with as little as 1/10" inch of rain. and our average storm here is
coffee in my car. the government is telling me so for me i'm on my way to hawaii in january january i'm not going to be -- i can't raise my son in this city. for you guys maybe yes. it can be a very good city. for us it's over if this continues. applause. so i'm on my way to paradise thank you very much. >> thank you, sir next speaker please? >> hi my name is brad -- i'm a driver and dispatcher i've seen for a long time i understand their appears to be a demand for more taxis i think the market maybe instead ly growing we've got new businesses coming in i understand that but what i ask you to do to stop us all from bleeding to death. maybe one or 2 hundred medallions at a time 500 could be a blow to our gut. if we're all going to be making less than minimum wage what kind of people are you going to have driving the taxis i don't think it's going to serve the city. that's a win-win the city will win the drivers will be a much slower bleed the market will hopefully continue to grow so that's what i want to put forward the other thing is drivers if you don't like uber please don'
grant program. we need to invest substantially more, on the federal government side, as an inducement to states and local governments to make the investments they need to make. man: but the federal role is going to continue to be diminished because of so many competing demands. so the expectation that the federal government will step in and infuse a lot of capital into water infrastructure, i think, is doubtful. and whether they should or not, i think, will continue to be debated. narrator: where money continues to be elusive, some cities and towns are turning their assets over to private companies, hoping the private sector can find the solutions they cannot. man: in the u.s., roughly 90% of all water and wastewater systems are still publicly owned and publicly managed. the remaining 10% are managed by privately held companies. man: the private sector has learned to become very efficient, and frequently a municipality can save themselves a significant amount of money by bringing in a private company. this is not true in all cases. there are some exceptionally well-run municipalities,
and local government. when i think about the hate crimes cases and the other cases i've done, i've made friends for life with local law enforcement officers, with local da's and local community leaders who have been our eyes and ears. when i look around this audience i really appreciate the fact you have all the ingredients of reform and improvement. i have had the privilege of serving in the federal government, as melinda described, i've had the privilege of serving in state government as a state cabinet official back in maryland, i've had the privilege of serving as a local elected official and governor -- once a local elected official, always a local elected official. what i learned from that is partnership is what it's all about. if you want to confront the most vexing problems, you have to bring people across an ideological spectrum, you have to include the business community, you have to include our nonprofit, our faith leaders. that's how you get things done, when you bring people together. and i look around this room and i see that you have already figured that out. i hope
is doing smart analytics. i think that's what you'll see happening as well, government starts to become smarter, make better decisions, better policies. this term algorithmic regulation, which means you can have laws and policies in the cities determined by data and not just what we think is best, but what's actually best. so, as cities keep catching on and more and more with the data, you're going to see some really interesting things coming out. >> cool. while we're talking about data, another part of the announcement today was also motion loft making private data available within sort of that initiative and that website wrieri'd like to hear a little more, john, about kind of deciding to share that data with the city and also a lot of times especially with other companies you see them being very protective of their data. there is a lot of value there. how do you sort of balance, protecting the value of your data and commercial viability versus making it available to the public? >> so, we have a unique problem, i think, to a lot of start-ups in the fact that we have a product that we
is regional governance and cooperation where we try to emphasize move each of our cities that they really need to figure out in their broader economic region, not just within their city limits. so how do you coordinate with the communities around you to advance some of these policy issues, whether it's transportation, environmental improvements, economic development, education systems, workforce training, etc. these are some of the issues that we really want to publicize the best practices so that practitioners such as ourselves can bring these ideas back home and really move an issue forward. i think here in the bay area, bringing this group of four european experts here has really been an interesting exercise for me, not knowing the city of oakland very much at all, having been to san francisco a few times, but it really is -- i do think that the communities here are poised to really be sort of going over the crest of the hill in terms of moving this issue forward. and i think hopefully these four will serve as sort of a catalyst in your community to get the community talking about what is p
/private partnerships and not run the government the way we used to run it and try to have good government cover and everything that is why it's important to have the business community get us good jobs and invest in education all of these things are going to help us be more successful and so focus more on that and try to keep my colleagues on the board of supervisors saying this is the smartest thing do and if we have money let's make a good investment of it. >> okay let's talk a bit about economic develop as it has been frontally mentioned here today we have the -- pleasure of hosting government rick perry recently for i think -- public blissity stunt but on a more serious level there has been a definite increase suns november about countries that are -- them sense against california company and is one is prop 30 which raise raises income tax on high earners and why should they come herein instead of somewhere else? >>> first of all, the pressure of our locally grown skeet successful equips are growing and if they can grow within the bay area and so, i'm alms -- between san francisco and
that we're very excited about the 33 rd annual government awards a project of spur their annual award ceremony is going to be held tonight and for municipal governments in san francisco this is the academy awards this is the highest honor that a city government or team can receive each year there's a panel of folks who a assemble and out of that they select i think 3 individuals and one team again out of the thousands of managers in this city so i'm very happy and proud to announce that one of our nominees is being honored lee -- our director of security investigations and emergency preparedness and enforcement is one of the award ees tonight it's a very high honor it's something that she's been recognized for although she's only been with us for a short time first as an sfpd employee she has revamped the way we prepare for and manage large events and a restructures of our enforcement division and in a very short period of time has made significant steps so we think you know we're biassed we think this is a very well deserved award and i'll be there at the event tonight to introduce
. they are not funding at government entities. it's very difficult to do the work you do and i commend you for it. what kind of demand do you have for the services that you provide? >> an unmeetable demand. you are right. we are privately funded and we scrounge for funds to keep working. we not only get to use students to work on our cases but we also get to teach them and get them to understand those things that john was talking about, how they need to question, don't go into court when a judge says, oh, well, yes the statute for post conviction dna says that you are entitled to counsel but i'm suspending that because there is no money to pay for an attorney. don't walk out and say a judge says we can't do it. teach them. then because we have no money, we reach out to the local bar. law firms like jim's law firm or chris's law firm help us in situations where we are trying to establish counsel and reinforce. we get over a thousand cases a year. from that first request we are usually able to take it down to about half. many of them who are writing to us are not claiming to be innocent. they are probabl
tail with the government and also to expand the scope of that beyond the areas that the government's efforts will cover. this will result in the most rapid and thorough exploration of new innovations that will help us reduce gun violence and reduce gun violence against our children. later this afternoon, the technology committee will be meeting and we will work on creating the structure and the promise to insure that all of the innovative ideas that we receive are developed and funded at the highest level possible. technology has proven itself successful in addressing some of our saturday's greatest challenges. and so today, we call on all of us to turn our attention and our energy towards ending gun violence against our children. thank you. >> joining us on stage are mark and jackie barton. >> first thing that we would like to say is thank you. thank you to the tech community. for putting your time and effort and research into this. and we would like to thank ron and jim. as you said my name is mark barton and this is my wife jackie. we have three children. james is 12, natalie is
of government action on supporting these kind of initiatives, even though we are aimed to doing this on a community level and a lot of progress can be made on a community level. we have been waiting for so long for a program like this. even with a contract that the initiative had some chance of putting it into effect this year we were overjoyed. what's more, i think the bigger objective in working for green energy whether it's government funding or private funded is to lead the way to showing people that green energy is for everybody and we don't need to wait on big energy companies and so forth to give us top down energy that this renewable energy technology gives us the capacity and it's going take initiatives like this po to popular i was this idea. i would like you to put this into effect as quickly as possible. >> thank you. next speakers. christian swin, gabby, jennifer fong. >> thank you, good afternoon. my name is ivy slagel. a san francisco resident since 1996. i represent residents. in my work with premium peace i work with folks across the country who are eagerly wa
efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ >>> while i get myself settled, maybe a show of hands. how many already been to see the exhibition? a number of you. first of all let me say good afternoon and first and foremost i would like to thank my colleagues in the education department in the fine arts museum of san francisco for an allowing me to speak today. valuable artwork -- rene, director of public programs and last on this list but certainly not least gregory stock who is a programming wizard. i'm so grateful for their individual and collective support. i would als
government. president obama has recognized the great effort that san francisco has started and want to continue. so we can eradicate violence here in san francisco and start a global movement. everyone here is touched by domestic violence. if you say you don't know, it may be your co-worker. or your sister that doesn't want to speak out. it could be your mother or grandmother. i do this in memory of a fellow co-worker, laura sweat, who was murdered by her husband. and in that moment two young children were left without a mother. i do this in her memory and in hope that the world will see no more violence. thank you for joining one billion rising. you have the power to save lives. [applause] thank you, julie chu, from the commission of women. there are vaginas around? i am marily mondejar. i am one of the organizers of the event tonight. and i am a survivor of domestic violence. i rise tonight because when i was 22 years old i did not know that i could leave my abusive marriage. i rise tonight because when i was 26 years old i did not know that there were countless other women suffer
on to our next item, no. # # 3. >> approval for consideration of budget 2013-2014 for government code section 5.6381. >> the budget once again from last year have not changed. all the price points what you are doing is coping last year's budget. because san francisco is in a bit of a budget crunch, staff is recommended that while we reserve our rights to the money according to state code that we return the money back to the general fund of the san francisco city and county and reserve the right to return the money itself. so we have the right to it in the future. if you have any questions, i'm happy to answer? >> that goes back to the clerk of the board is that correct? >> yes. it goes back to where the money comes from okay. comments or questions? >> i know the budget is going to come back for us again, it would be helpful to have more of a detailed break down in terms of where this is going. i know for example you have a proposals sflafco budget explanation and it talks about what these categories are but it doesn't specify the amount per category, so i just wanted a lot more detai
up into the fiscal cliff 2.0 in how the government tempts to deal with it. so you may ask yourself we have a portion of the tax increases went through and who knows exactly what congress is going to but it's probably a pretty good guess that we get to the very last minute right before the march 1st effective gate date for the spending cuts and then we get some other short-term extension to add to this made for tv drama that they seem so fond of lately and you wonder where does it get us long term and how are we able to close the gap here the congressional budget office has looked at what they consider to be the most likely outcome of the ongoing negotiations which, is a marshal implementation of these spending cuts and what you see here are two lines. the top line is out lace as a percentage of gdp or government spending as a percentage of gdp and starting today and going out through the end of 2022 and this is a forecast for the next nine years and going below that is rather a new as a% of gdp and what you take way here is what are we dealing with this budget deficit problem for
francisco government tv. the camera in front is only aimed at the podium. it is not taking shots of the audience, only the podium for people who want to ask questions. so do not worry, you are not on tv if you do not want to be. >> thank you for your patience. i am a representative with leader pelosi, and i'm thrilled to have you today to learn more of our best practices for accessing credit. it is a priority for our office. we are very well aware of how small businesses are running up against the wall right now in terms of trying to get the credit and loans they are looking for, so i will try hard to bring the brightest minds in this room so you can effectively fix their range and learn more about what you can do better to fix your business plan and what it is they are looking for. first of all, i will introduce everyone. mark quinn is the san francisco district director of the u.s. small business administration. the small business administration covers not only san francisco proper but the bay area. the severed his third district is responsible for a business loan portfolio of
, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, rus
and working hard on economic development and job retention. he is making city government more responsive and efficient and making public safety a top priority. mayor lee is a long time public servant. prior to becoming mayor, he served as city administrator where he focused on government efficiency and measures and reforms that reduced the size and cost of government. mayor lee first began working for the city and county of san francisco in 1989 as the investigator for the city's first whistle blower program. prior to employment with the city and county of san francisco, he was the managing attorney for the asian law caucus. i first met ed in 1992 when he became the executive director for the human rights commission and we were both 16. that's two decades ago, ed. i watched him soon become the director of city purchasing and then going on to become the director of public works. i think ed is the only mayor in city history that can carry tlau on the campaign promise to fill the potholes because he actually knows how and he's the only mayor in city history that can say he actually kn
to work with, with government officials and others, how do we get to the facilities to fix them. in terms of an emergency response stand point, we have stand by back ups, we have stand by centers, we can operate an emergency center in san francisco out of walnut creek, out of san ramon, almost anywhere in the state if we choose to. in terms of working with local governments, we are members of many state, federal and local emergency response organizations. again we're a regional company so it's not just about one general location, it's about serving every one of our local service areas whether it's san francisco or the san joaquin valley. >> thank you, mr. boland. >> we fill a little different role. we don't have any infrastructure but we represent utilities that have 88 percent of the infrastructure that keep our populations running. we cover from the mexican border to oregon and what we facilitate through the organization is we are embedded with the state of california through the last 60 years. we are in the cali complex, we have an mou with the secretary of cali and can bring resou
government officials in the south, people who believed that an idea -- believed in an idea that we're all created equal and that we're willing to risk and that we're willing to risk their life in the purchase soul of a lofty promise in america. today we celebrate black history month and the catalyst to progress that the emancipation proclamation as well as the march on washington provided us. we are familiar with the incarnation, whether it's the work of gandhi, mother theresa, or nelson mandela, people who have carried the torch of love and equality into the dark caves of tyrany and emerged bloody, but unbowed, they are examples of love's true limitless potential. thank you. (applause) >> and even, and even in the face of institutional hatred, the legacy of their work is a beacon for the world that loves will triumphant at the end of the day. it's triumphant because love, brotherhood and togetherness bind us together as americans. it's who we are as america. it's in our dna and those who are not part of this plan, who are not part of our constitution will eventually be overrun by our co
time the beginning of the lunar new year. for the first time our government is headed up by asian-americans. our mayor and our judicial officer, judge lee and our board of supervisors. in fact we have so many asian-americans we are often confused for each other. eric mar and i am confused of each other. and because of their moustache, norman lee and our mayor. this is an amazing week for sports. during the past week we had the asian-american basketball star, jeremy lin come to the bay area. and our giants are starting spring training. i think that is auspicious. but as our mayor said, we have had so many gains we have made. but we know we have a lot of work to do. we just built an amazing chinatown conference and we have to be sure that we remain solvent. we are a city of immigrants. and we know that nationally we are having a debate. we need to be sure that reform happens. i know that every elected official and those who work for the city and county of san francisco, want to be sure that our asian seniors and our asian kids and families are taken care of. i want to thank all of y
know that there is no simple answer to this. this is our mission. and it will take government action. we are going to have to look into our hearts about the way that we treat each other. fundamental family values, connecting, talk to the person who is sitting alone. and the unity, and the tech effort is going to bring to this. it is going to be a huge part of fixing this. and we just want to say thank you, because i think we are going to work together to make the world safer for our children, and their children and so, hopefully in the not too distant future, we are live in a safer society. thank you all very much. >> nicole hawkly. >> i want to echo what mark and jackie said around their thanks for everyone who is here today and supporting this initiative. my name is niekol hawyly and we have two sons at elementary, jake is in third grade and dillan was in first and last friday would have been his 7th birthday. we were dreading friday, his birthday, but thanks to our friends and wonderful community, it was changed from a day filled with pain and loss into one of beauty and positivit
, and equal opportunities in the government before starting her political career in 1993, she worked in the european level in environmental and social organizations for 10 years. as a politician, she focuses particularly on the development of economically depressed areas which despite their assets face challenges like poverty, unemployment, and a lack of development. she believes these neighbors are a key to a vibrant and prosperous brussels. please. >> i'm happy to be here and as far as i could take note is the situation for cyclists as well as in oakland as in portland as in san francisco -- excuse me, i think, yes, important to be again the whole different thing. but as i understand most probably brussels is somewhere in-between. in the last few years, we managed to raise the amount of cyclists let's say from 1% in 2000 to what today is estimated but how did the countings go, but it's estimated as being 3 1/2%. i have made it as one of my priorities to put the discussion on what we call soft mobility for pedestrians and cyclists to put it on the political agenda and being a deputy
will focus on becoming a government contractor, how your small business can partner with the government. the next one will also be on how to grain your business, with tax -- green your business, tax credits available with that. for non-profit, charitable organizations, we have a workshop coming up. that is helpful for those of you who are looking to access the committee on a durable basis. >> also, on behalf of leader pelosi, i want to thank our panel and her staff. we are tenants in this building. i apologize for the security situation that happened upstairs. if you have concerns about it, please come and see me. i would like to convey those to the landlord here so that it does not happen again. thank you. >> hi, everybody. my name is carmen chu. why don't we get started. with a marking up with the department of small business -- we have been working with the department of small business. this project started when we heard from neighborhood merchants. unfortunately, they had access issues, visibility access issues. we have been working closely with many of our partners year today to e
gratitude to the san francisco library for the last ten years and there is san francisco government tv and this is going to be broadcast throughout the year. so thank you. i would like to thank julie tron from the bar association. the bar association has been our partners in terms of providing defense for poor people. in cases where the public defender is not able to provide representation, those cases are handled by the private bar and they are doing an incredible job. so thank you very much for that. i want to thank jose as a who is a public defender and here to celebrate with us. we are going to start today by showing a brief video explaining the gideon decisions >> take this empty lot. today you would never know it but history was made here. mostly all is gone and so are the people. the principle they left is still standing. it was almost as bad at life. >> it was a constitutional hero, but the cases that come to the court don't come from the winners in society. they come from the losers. clarence gideon was involved in the justice system since he was a kid. he had been getting i
a wider coalition in order to be more effective we reached out to a large variety of the government sectors. in february 2008 the jewish coalition held a conference against human trafficking which included agencies such as the san francisco commission on the status of women, representative of the mayor's office and other nonprofits. this event also attracted members of the state assembly and a few congressional offices. at a meeting following our conference a i was asked to chair the larger group and my condition was that there be a cochair from the mayor's office at that time was catherine dodd. the san francisco collaborative against human traffic was born. in 2010 - from the beginning emily morassie (sounds like) executive director of the san francisco commission on the status of women was always involved as well as theresa sparks, executive director of the human rights commission. they were not only the core of the beginning but also generously offered to help us and support us and today that is where we are housed. we have a membership of over 28 agencies public and priv
and responsiveness for government that serves all san franciscoance. she's truly a leader and i'm so glad to perform this swearing in for carmen. so carmen, if you will, please raise your right hand and repeat after me. >> i carmen chu do solemnly a firm that i will support and defend constitution of the state of california against all enemies foreign and domestic that i will bare true faith in allegiance to the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california. that i take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion. and that i will well and faithfully discharge the duties upon which i'm about to enter during such time as i hold the office of assess or recorder for the city and county of san francisco. congratulations, carmen. [ applause ] wow! now, we proceed to the supervisor. and i am proud to acknowledge my appointment of katie tang as districts 4 supervisor. [ applause ] katie has demonstrated hard work and diligence under supervisor legislative aid, working with budget. stream lining bureaucracy and pushing for advocacy for our n
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 142 (some duplicates have been removed)